Information for Current Undergraduate and Study Abroad Students

students on campus

What can Is study?

You can choose any course, up to a maximum of ten credits from the following subject areas. Once you have chosen your preffered course, you can register below.

Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology

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Exploring epic poetry in the ancient world

A fast-paced taster course exploring the world of epic in the ancient classical world and in Egypt. You will study key themes within the world’s greatest epics, Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, the Epic of Gilgamesh, set alongside some lesser known but equally wonderful works too.  

Credits: 5

Weeks: 5 

Delivery: Online (anytime)

Start date/time: 15th of February 2023

Class code: 1083

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Art and Art History

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Art through the ages: sculpting the human figure

This online course focuses on the diverse ways in which the human figure has been represented in sculpture across time in different cultural contexts. Each week, we will explore key examples of the sculptural tradition of a different time period, starting with ancient Egypt and finishing with the 20th century. This sweep through time and cultural space will allow us to explore the evolving relationship between form and function, and all the diverse ways the human body has been manipulated to fit particular agendas. Case studies will range from the Egypto-Roman statues of Antinous, to Michelangelo’s David, and Epstein’s The Rock DrillStudents will have the opportunity to participate in weekly webinars.  

NB: This course is delivered asynchronously ie the course materials are provided on Moodle (our online learning platform) to allow self-paced learning, with no live online sessions. 

Areas you'll explore include: 

  • The evolution of the human form in sculpture within different cultural contexts across time. 
  • The agendas underlying the use of particular styles of sculpting the human body were.  
  • Explore the features that define the representation of the human body in three dimensions. 

 By the end of the course, you’ll be able to: 

  • Discuss and define the relationship between form and function within specific cultural and temporal contexts. 
  • Contrast methods of depiction and their associated symbolism across time and space. 
  • Culturally contextualise the significance of key case studies synchronically and diachronically. 

Credits: 5

Weeks: 5

Delivery: Online (anytime)

Start date: 6th of April 2023

Class code: 5597

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El Greco to Goya: Spanish painting in focus

This course provides an introduction to the fascinating contribution to painting in Spain of five outstanding artists who enjoyed international renown. Each week we will look at a different artist and, while we focus on the following five artists, El Greco, Velazquez, Zurbaran, Murillo and Goya, we will also explore their work in its social and historical context. This context includes consideration of the status and work of contemporary women artists connected with the Spanish court such as the Italian painters Sofonisba Anguissola and Lavinia Fontana. Reference will be made to major examples in European and British national and public collections. 

Areas you'll explore include: 

  • Painting in Spain from c.1570-1830. 
  • The principal themes and styles of painting which developed during this period through the work of five major artists based in the cities of Toledo, Seville and Madrid. 
  • Consider Spanish painting in the context of European art. 

 By the end of the course, you’ll be able to: 

  • Discuss the main themes and stylistic changes in Spanish painting from c.1570-1830 and their relation to western European painting. 
  • Distinguish between the work of the five outstanding artists studied and the subjects they specialised in.  

Credits: 5

Weeks: 5 (Every Wednesday)

Delivery: Online (live)

Start date/time: 10th of May 2023-10.00-12.00

Class code: 9375

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Introduction art psychotherapy

Art psychotherapy is a psychological therapy that uses art materials for self-expression and reflection in the presence of a trained art psychotherapist. The course will outline the key theoretical orientations within art psychotherapy and will present case examples of art psychotherapy work in practice with a variety of client groups and settings. Learning will be facilitated through lectures, case presentations, group discussions and written submissions. This course is an ideal introduction to art psychotherapy, especially for anyone working with vulnerable people, including teachers/classroom assistants, social workers, support workers and community-based workers. It is also ideal for those with a general curiosity about art psychotherapy or with an interest in applying for an MSc in Art Psychotherapy  

It is important to note that this course does not qualify students to practice art psychotherapy.   

Areas you'll explore include: 

  • The underlying theories, principles, and practices of art psychotherapy, and the relationship is between client, artwork, and therapist. 
  • What’s involved in studying on a Postgraduate Diploma Training scheme recognised by the British Association of Art Therapists. 

By the end of the course, you’ll be able to:  

  • Explain the relationship between client, artwork, and therapist 
  • Recognise the importance of self-reflection and awareness in the understanding of the therapeutic process 
  • Identify and recognise differing methods of approach with various client groups, and identify the difference between art as recreation, art that is therapeutic and art psychotherapy. 

Credits: 10

Weeks: 10 (Every Wednesday)

Delivery: Online (live)

Start date/time: 5th of April 2023-18.00-20.00

Class code: 12613

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Van Eyck to Van Dyck: Flemish artists in focus

This course explores the remarkable contribution to painting made by five outstanding Flemish artists who enjoyed international renown. Each week we will look at a different artist and while we focus on the following five artists, Van Eyck, Van der Weyden, Bruegel the elder, Rubens and Van Dyck, we will explore their work in its social and historical context, including consideration of the status and work of contemporary women artists such as Catharina Van Hemessen and Clara Peeters. Reference will be made to major examples in European and British national and public collections. 

Areas you'll explore include: 

  • Flemish painting from c.1430-1640 
  • The principal themes and styles of painting which developed during this period through the work of five major artists based in the cities of Bruges, Brussels and Antwerp. 
  • key examples of these artists’ paintings. 
  • Flemish painting in the context of European art. 

By the end of the course, you’ll be able to:  

  • Identify the main themes and stylistic changes in Flemish painting from c. 1430-1640 and their relationship to European painting 
  • Distinguish between the work of the artists studied, and the subjects they specialised in. 
  • Contextually analyse the Flemish works of art covered in the course  

Credits: 5

Weeks: 5 (Every Wednesday)

Delivery: Online (live)

Start date/time: 5th of April 2023-10.00-12.00

Class code: 7711

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Creative Writing

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Introduction to Creative Non-Fiction: life writing, memoir and autofiction

Everyone has a story to tell about their life, but it can be hard to get down on paper. Life-writing, memoir, and autobiographical fiction (or autofiction) bring our real experiences to life on the page in different ways, helping us make sense of events and share our most important moments as compelling stories and reflections.  

Join this practical course to learn how to write about your life in new ways, from personal memories and engaging adventures to imaginative musings on your life. In other words, learn how to write what you know, well.  

Over a series of talks, close-readings and approachable writing exercises, our expert tutor will explain: 

  • the key features of life writing, memoir and autofiction including distinct techniques, structures, forms and styles 
  • how to try these ideas and techniques out in your own writing, share what you’ve written and improve with mutual feedback  
  • the ethical implications and options available when drawing on real life for inspiration 

You will also have the chance to discuss and reflect on what you learn with other students and the tutor in seminars. 

 Choose this course if you want to learn: 

  • more about how to write about real-life memories, experiences and reflections in imaginative new ways using prompts that kickstart or reenergise your writing 
  • how to share your work and improve with mutual feedback, then edit and refine your work  
  • more about the ethical implications and options available when drawing on real life for inspiration 
  • (for those who submit for assessment) how to improve with written feedback and how to reflect on your writing process. 

Credits: 10

Weeks: 10 (every Tuesday)

Delivery: Online-live

Start date/time: 4th of April 2023- 18.30-20.30

Class code: 3329

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Introduction to Creative Writing

Do you love fiction, poems or real-life stories and would love to write one yourself? Are you buzzing with ideas but nervous and unsure where to start? Would you benefit from some guidance and encouragement on how to write?   

Join this playful and supportive practical course to learn the foundational skills central to four main types of creative writing: poetry, short story, novel and creative non-fiction. This course offers anyone new to creative writing a chance try these forms out with encouragement, support and guidance. 

Over a series of welcoming talks, close-readings and approachable writing exercises, our expert tutor will explain: 

  • the key features of different types of creative writing  
  • how to try these ideas and techniques out in your own writing 
  • (optional) how to share what you’ve written and improve with mutual feedback  

You will also have the chance to discuss and reflect on what you learn with other students and the tutor in seminars 

Choose this course if you want to learn: 

  • the basics of what makes a poetry, short story, novel and creative non-fiction, and how to write them 
  • writing prompts that kickstart new ideas 
  • how to share your work and improve with mutual feedback  
  • (for those who opt to submit for assessment) how to improve with written feedback and how to reflect on your writing process. 

Credits: 10

There are two options for this course:

1st option:

Weeks: 10 (every Thursday)

Delivery: On campus

Start date/time: 6th of April 2023- 19.00-21.00

Class code: 1708

2nd option:

Weeks: 10 (every Thursday)

Delivery: Online-live

Start date/time: 29th of June 2023- 13.00-15.00

Class code: 1707

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Introduction to in-gallery ekphrasis: writing poetry inspire

New to writing poetry and looking for inspiration? An emerging poet looking to reinvigorate your craft? Or perhaps you enjoy visiting galleries and are looking for new ways to think and write about art? Ekphrastic poetry might provide a new way to see and respond to art. 

An ekphrastic poem is one written in response to a work of art. This may be a painting, sculpture, photograph, film or even a dance but the poem created will be entirely up to you and the way you uniquely sense and experience the piece be it online, or more traditionally, in person in a gallery. 

Join this short in-person course to visit a series of five galleries in and around Glasgow and find inspiration to start writing ekphrastic poetry. Guided by a tutor, find art pieces to write poems about at each of the locations below, which are located near public transport and publicly accessible:  

  • Hunterian Art Gallery 
  • Transmission 
  • Kelvingrove 
  • GOMA 
  • Burrell Collection 

Meeting in-situ at each location, this is an ideal course for those new to writing poetry or curious to discover new ways to be inspired by public art in Glasgow. 

Over a series of approachable writing exercises, our expert tutor will explain: 

  • A variety of ways to pay attention to, observe and encounter art  
  • Different creative approaches and poetic techniques for writing ekphrastic poems inspired by the artworks in each location 

You will also have the chance to discuss and reflect on what you learn with other students and the tutor. 

Choose this course if you want to learn: 

  • more about how to write about art in imaginative new ways using prompts that kickstart or rejuvenate your writing 
  • how to write poems and apply poetic techniques  
  • how to share your work and improve by editing and refining your work  
  • (for those who submit for assessment) how to improve with written feedback and how to reflect on your writing process. 

Credits: 5

Weeks: 5 (every Wednesday)

Delivery: On campus

Start date/time: 10th of May 2023- 11.00-13.00

Class code: TBC

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Introduction to novel writing: keeping going

As Thomas Mann so famously put it, "a writer is someone for whom writing is more difficult than it is for other people." Nowhere is this truer than for the marathon effort it takes to write a novel! How can you hold on to so many plots, characters, scenes, settings and story ideas at once? After getting started, how do you keep going? 

Join this practical and encouraging course for new writers to give your existing novel plans a big push forward. Learn new ways to create engaging characters, keep up a strong narrative structure and entice readers to keep reading. Find new helpful habits and tips and feel supported to write more and learn more from sharing what you write. In short, refresh your motivation and practise to keep going with your novel plans whether you are a newcomer or an existing writer in need of fresh inspiration. 

Over a series of welcoming talks, close-readings and approachable writing exercises, our expert tutor will explain: 

  • The key features of short stories  
  • how to apply these ideas and techniques to your own writing 
  • how to share what you’ve written with others and improve with feedback  

You will also have the chance to discuss and reflect on what you learn with other students and the tutor in seminars. 

Choose this course if you want to learn: 

  • the basics of what makes novels work 
  • key techniques to help you write your novel 
  • how to share your work and improve with mutual feedback 
  • (for those who submit for assessment) how to improve with written feedback, how to reflect on your writing process 

Credits: 10

Weeks: 10 (every Saturday)

Delivery: Onlive (live)

Start date/time: 8th of April 2023- 13.00-15.00

Class code: 10435

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History, Politics and International Affairs

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Exploring Scotland’s slavery past in 5 locations

Glasgow gained enormous profits from the tobacco trade with the Americas. These riches, derived from the unpaid labour of enslaved people and their brutal treatment, powered the city’s unprecedented growth into the “second city of the Empire” transforming buildings, industry and trade in central Scotland. But where can the evidence of this relationship be found today? What does it mean for how Scotland faces this past? 

Join this course to explore five locations with significant and often overlooked links to slavery. These are the Merchant City; Greenock and Port Glasgow; the Clyde; the New Town of Edinburgh; and the Gilmorehill campus of the University of Glasgow.  

Whether you are interested in the history of slavery, the development of Glasgow, the economic and social history of central Scotland, human rights and racial equality, or in connections between Scotland and the Americas, take this course to see the bigger picture of how Scotland’s relationship to slavery contributed to the world we see today. 

Over a series of talks our expert tutor will explain: 

  • how New World slavery contributed towards the industrialisation of Scotland between 1750 to 1850 
  • how five sites in central Scotland were directly impacted by the profits and demands of the slave economy 
  • how the legacies of slavery are still visible in the built environment in Scotland 

You will also have the chance to discuss and reflect on what you learn with other students and the tutor in seminars. 

Choose this course if you want to learn: 

  • the historical importance of slavery to Scotland 
  • the links between the slave economy and the industrial development of central Scotland 
  • how to “read” the legacy of the slave economy in the industrial  landscape 

Credits: 5

Weeks: 5 (every Tuesday)

Delivery: Online (live)

Start date/time: 4th of April 2023- 19.00-21.00

Class code: 6308

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Fake news and civic society

With the rise of smart phones, fake news on social media is now a vast industry spreading dangerously influential content. How do we know what is "real" and what is not? And what impact does this have on how we trust civic authorities in the media, public health and elections in a democracy?  

Join this course to not only explore the spread of false and misleading stories in the media and how they could undermine democracy but also learn practical skills on how to spot and stop them. 

Over a series of talks our expert tutor will explain: 

  • the history of fake news  
  • the impact of fake news today 
  • how to identify fake news in the future  

You will also have the chance to discuss and reflect on what you learn with other students and the tutor in seminars. 

Choose this course if you want to learn: 

  • how to spot and fact check fake news on social media 
  • how fake news undermines our trust in the media, public health and elections 
  • More about how democracy works, in particular the trust we place in civic representatives 

Credits: 10

Weeks: 10 (every Thursday)

Delivery: Online-live

Start date/time: 6th of April 2023: 18.00-20.00

Class code: 10118

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Hitler's Lightning War: The Battle of France, 1940 

In the summer of 1940, the Germans conquered the Low Countries (Belgium, the Netherlands, Luxembourg), defeated France and drove the British out of Western Europe. Hitler’s achievements were sudden and shocking. Franco-British leaders believed they were well prepared for a potential war with Germany, so what went wrong? Was it Allied weakness or German strength which proved most decisive? What did this battle mean for the rest of the Second World War? 

This course examines the key events that led to German success during this pivotal year, including fraught Franco-British cooperation, the Air War and the Dunkirk evacuation. It also explores the repercussions of this swift defeat.  

Over a series of talks our expert tutor will explain: 

  • the key figures and events shaping the Battle for France in 1940  
  • examine contemporary materials and compare differing historians’ perspectives to gain a better understanding of this pivotal moment in the Second World War 

You will also have the opportunity to discuss key events and historical debates with your tutor and other students in class.  

Choose this course if you want to learn: 

  • More about the war on the western front during the Second World War 
  • Military and political strategies on both the allied and axis side 

Credits: 5

Weeks: 5 (every Wednesday)

Delivery: Online (live)

Start date/time: 10th of May 2023: 19.00-21.00

Class code: 17142

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Inside the American Presidency: The Biden Administration

After the upheaval of the Trump years, President Joe Biden and his team face extraordinary challenges in putting into place their domestic and international policy agenda. From addressing the stacked Supreme court, the invasion of the Capital building, continued denial of electoral legitimacy, changes to abortion rights, additional voting regulations, tension over migration, calls for racial justice in policing, climate change, a more emboldened China and the war in Ukraine, America has rarely been more divided or as challenged, internally and internationally. November 2022 brings mid-term elections which will be key to deciding Biden’s future direction, or not. How will he face down the provocations of a MAGA republican party and hold his own increasingly fractured party together? What kind of federal and state government can function together? What kind of leader will Biden be on the world stage? 

Join this unique course to gain up-to-the-minute insights into the Biden Presidency and the challenges faced by the United States.  

Whether you are interested in American history or politics, the balance of power in modern democracies, the presidential system of government, or current affairs in general, take this course to see the bigger picture of the dramatic events shaping the world’s largest democracy. 

Over a series of talks our expert tutor will explain: 

  • the key current objectives of the Biden Administration 
  • the advantages and obstacles facing Biden in the context of contemporary American domestic politics 
  • key evidence from these events and historical perspectives and debates 

You will also have the chance to discuss and reflect on what you learn with other students and the tutor in seminars 

Choose this course if you want to learn: 

  • More about the political landscape in which President Biden operates, and how this affects his ability to put his stated policies into practice  
  • How the federal system, Congress and Senate interact with the white House to produce America’s domestic and international policy 

Credits: 5

Weeks: 5 (every Friday)

Delivery: Online (live)

Start date/time: 14th of April 2023: 10.00-12.00

Class code: 25943

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Scotland after the Union 1707-1838

Scotland experienced profound and long-lasting social, economic and cultural changes after the Union with England in 1707, including revolutions in agriculture, industry and culture. Other developments during this momentous period include the rise and fall of Jacobitism, the Highland and rural clearances, emigration and access to markets in England and the Empire. Is it any wonder this era is frequently depicted in books, TV and films such as the popular ‘Outland’ series. But was this a straightforward ‘takeover’ or were the changes the Union brought eagerly absorbed? How did daily life for the people of Scotland differ? Was this a ‘new’ Scotland within ‘Greater Britian’ or the same old nation and divisions? 

Whether you are interested in Scottish history, politics, industry or culture, take this course to see the bigger picture of dramatic events shaping its development during this tumultuous era. 

Over a series of talks our expert tutor will explain: 

  • the key people and events of this exciting period 
  • the impact of industrialisation and urbanisation 
  • key evidence from these events and later historical perspectives and debates 

Choose this course if you want to learn: 

  • More about the significant events in society, politics and the economy of Scotland in this period 
  • How developments in agriculture, industry, urbanisation and the Enlightenment changed Scottish society 

Credits: 10

Weeks: 10 (every Thursday)

Delivery: Online (live)

Start date/time: 6th of April 2023: 19.30-21.30

Class code: 3962

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Scotland in the Middle Ages 1124 - 1371

Scotland’s momentous journey to nationhood hit a critical moment in 1124 with the accession of David I, one of medieval Scotland's most influential rulers, who shaped such epic feudal, monastic and economic changes that his reign is sometimes called the "Davidian Revolution”. His reign and that of David II until 1371, encompass some of Scotland’s most fascinating history, such as the lives of Robert the Bruce and William Wallace, the influence of the Church on society and politics, the territorial expansion of Scotland and dramatic Anglo-Scottish relations. 

Whether you are interested in Scottish history, the rise of nations, the spread of Christianity, life in the Medieval period, or the development of a Scottish identity, take this course to see the bigger picture of dramatic events during the 600 years that shaped a nation. 

Over a series of talks our expert tutor will explain: 

  • key political, religious, social, cultural and territorial events taking place during this significant period 
  • key evidence from these events and later historical perspectives and debates 

You will also have the chance to discuss and reflect on what you learn with other students and the tutor in seminars 

Choose this course if you want to learn: 

  • More about the differences of culture and society among the four groups that made Scotland, and how these shaped the new nation 
  • how Scotland’s religious institutions and land ownership shaped society, during the feudal system 

Credits: 10

Weeks: 10 (every Tuesday)

Delivery: Online (live)

Start date/time: 4th of April 2023: 10.00-12.00

Class code: 9193

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The Irish Revolution 1912-1925

The years 1912-25 saw a violent end to British rule in Ireland and its replacement by two new Irish states representing conflicting visions of the future. A complex and contested transition that remains in dispute and continues to impact Irish, UK, US and European relations to this day. 

Join this brief 5-week course to take a closer look at this intense period of dramatic consequence. From the first stirrings of revolt in Ulster, through the Easter Rising, to the political turmoil of violent insurrection, partition and civil war, this course will explore the events of this momentous decade and how they continue to shape modern Ireland today. An ideal course for anyone interested in the complexities of contemporary Irish identity, the role of violence in Irish politics and the ambiguous political settlement which emerged as an answer to the age-old Irish question. 

Over a series of talks our expert tutor will explain: 

  • Key events of the Irish revolution from the Ulster Crisis of 1912 to the final settlement of the Ulster boundary in 1925 
  • key evidence from these events and expert historical perspectives and debates 

You will also have the chance to discuss and reflect on what you learn with other students and the tutor in seminars. 

Choose this course if you want to learn: 

  • more about the causes and consequences of the Irish revolution including the development of nationalism and unionism, the breakdown of British authority in south and west Ireland, the establishment of partition and civil war 
  • The radical challenge to British rule in Ireland in the shape of Sinn Fein and the I.R.A, and the role of key individuals including Michael Collins, James Craig and Eamon de Valera 

Credits: 5

There are two options:

Weeks: 5 (every Wednesday)

Delivery: Online (live)

Start date/time: 5th of April 2023: 19.00-21.00

Class code: 6478

or:

Weeks: 5 (every Wednesday)

Delivery: On campus

Start date/time: 28th of June 2023: 10.00-12.00

Class code: 6479

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The Russian Revolution

In 1913 the Russian Tsar Nicholas II celebrated 300 years of Romanov rule. The vast Empire he governed was both prosperous and powerful, and his autocratic rule seemed unassailable. Yet, within a decade both he and his regime had been obliterated; over 20 million Russians were dead, and a radical new autocracy was in power in the shape of Lenin and the Bolsheviks. How was the old order usurped so completely and a new Russia emerge? How did the revolutionary state evolve in turn into the vast USSR with Stalin in charge? Over a century later, what historical echoes can we trace in the Russian state we know today?  

Join this fascinating course to place the dramatic and shocking events of the Russia Revolution in a deeper and richer historical context, from the early idealism of the abortive revolution of 1905, through to the rise of Stalin in the late 1920s and the descent into the totalitarianism and terror of the Soviet system.  

Over a series of talks, our expert tutor will explain: 

  • The key events shaping the politics, society, culture and economy of Russia between 1905 and 1929, such as the First World War, the rise of the Bolsheviks over other revolutionary groups and Stalin’s ‘revolution from above’ 
  • the key archives, sources and first-hand accounts available 
  • the major historical perspectives and debates 

You will also have the chance to discuss and reflect on what you learn with other students and the tutor in seminars. 

Choose this course if you want to learn: 

  • the major causes and consequences of the revolution, the figures involved and their impact 
  • How the revolution still shapes Russia’s distinctive social, political, cultural, economic and territorial development in the 20th Century 

Credits: 10

Weeks: 10 (every Friday)

Delivery: Online (live)

Start date/time: 14th of April 2023: 10.00-12.00

Class code: 5277

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Literature

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Reading classic short stories from the 19th Century

It wasn’t until the 19th Century that short stories began to appear regularly in print and in dedicated collected editions across the UK, USA, Germany, France and Russia. A ‘golden age’ of short story writing emerged portraying unforgettable characters, innovative plots and timeless philosophical themes.  

Join this course to chart the development of the short story as a literary art form during this important period. Focussing on in-depth analysis of a range of short stories, this course tracks the extraordinary proliferation of new styles, structures, themes and techniques during this time. Students will also learn the historical and literary context of these stories and explore their lasting impact on readers and writers to the present day. 

Over a series of talks and collective close-readings, our expert tutor will explain: 

  • key distinctive literary features of the short story form over the course of the 19th century through close textual analysis of a range of notable examples from UK, USA, Germany, France and Russia. 
  • their historical background and literary context  
  • their philosophical views on life 

You will also have the chance to discuss and reflect on what you learn with other students and the tutor in seminars 

Choose this course if you want to learn: 

  • more about the short story form and the rewards of close reading 
  • more about how short stories are written, received and influence others 
  • more about some classic 19th century short story writers as a literary figures 
  • more about the broader historical context of the short story 

Credits: 10

Weeks: 10 (every Wednesday)

Delivery: Online-live

Start date/time: 5th of April 2023-19.00-21.00

Code: 27280

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Reading contemporary Gothic Horror writing

From ‘Stranger Things’ to Stephen King, gothic horror writing continues to be a popular form in the 21st Century inspiring many film and TV adaptions and cult followings. It both probes at the underbelly of our contemporary concerns and draws on long traditions of horror writing. But what are the common literary features of gothic horror writing today, if any? How are we scared, why and what role does it play?  

This brief course explores the development of gothic horror literature over the course of the 21st century so far. Through a series of talks and discussions, it provides an in-depth analysis of a selection of recent texts to help chart the diversity of styles, structures, themes and techniques since the turn of the century. Students will discuss the recent social and literary context of these stories, and also explore their abiding historical connections. 

Over a series of talks and collective close-readings, our expert tutor will explain: 

  • key distinctive literary features of gothic horror writing in 21st Century through close textual analysis of a range of notable examples 
  • their social background and literary context  

You will also have the chance to discuss and reflect on what you learn with other students and the tutor in seminars 

Choose this course if you want to learn: 

  • more about gothic horror as a literary mode and the rewards of close reading 
  • more about how these texts are written, received and influence others 
  • more about the broader social context of these texts 

Credits: 5

Weeks: 5 (every Wednesday)

Delivery: Online-live

Start date/time: 5th of April 2023-19.00-21.00

Code: 27288

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Philosophy

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Continental perspectives on truth: Nietzsche, Bergson and Deleuze

“The pure present is an ungraspable advance of the past devouring the future. In truth, all sensation is already memory.” Henri Bergson 

With the ongoing discovery of the mechanisms driving human perception, many philosophical figures have grappled with the problem of how humans find truth and what it is. This course introduces students to the work of three significant figures in the continental tradition of philosophy - Friedrich Nietzsche, Henri Bergson and Gilles Deleuze – and explores their perspectives on philosophical truth. In particular, this course compares the way they challenge our pursuit of truth by questioning its sources, shifting our attention away from abstract models towards embodied, intuitive and expressive modes of thinking.  

More broadly, the course invites students to appreciate this form of philosophy as a beneficial discursive practice which enhances the agency of inquirers. In keeping with continental tradition, it will also examine ways to apply these perspectives to contemporary situations such as post-truth politics and conspiracy theories. 

Over a series of talks and selected readings, our expert tutor will explain: 

  • key figures Nietzsche, Bergson and Deleuze  
  • their main ideas and arguments in pursuit of the truth 
  • the nature of consciousness and self-knowledge 
  • the meaning of authenticity  
  • the context their ideas emerged from and how they can be applied today 

You will also have the chance to discuss and reflect on what you learn with other students and the tutor in seminars 

Choose this course if you want to learn: 

  • The basic philosophical problems and arguments concerning the pursuit of truth in the work of these key figures in the Western Philosophical tradition. 
  • How to share your thinking in discussion and learn from others 

Credits: 10

Weeks: 10 (every Thursday)

Delivery: Online (live)

Start date/time: 6th of April 2023-19.00-21.00

Class code: 8057

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Elementary formal logic: an introduction

In our world of competing opinions and biases, it can be difficult to find a reasonable, repeatable, and accurate way to interrogate what’s really going on. Being logical is a proper or sound way of thinking about something, good judgement or some might say practical common sense. The rules of logic have been developed over more than two millennia by contributions from numerous philosophers, mathematicians, and empirical scientists, including famous names such as Socrates, Plato, Leibniz, Boole, Frege, and Russell. But what are those rules, exactly? And how can they applied to produce logical proofs? 

Join this course to explore these and further questions through an introduction to the basic elements of formal logic including concepts such as semantic entailment and truth functionality, as well as how to apply basic logical notation (translating from ordinary language into the language of formal logic) and produce logical proofs. 

Over a series of talks and selected readings, our expert tutor will explain: 

  • the basic elements of formal logic including concepts such as semantic entailment and truth functionality, as well as how to apply basic logical notation (translating from ordinary language into the language of formal logic) and produce logical proofs.  
  • the context these ideas emerged from and how they can be applied today 

You will also have the chance to discuss and reflect on what you learn with other students and the tutor in seminars 

Choose this course if you want to learn: 

  • The basic philosophical problems and arguments concerning Logic, reasoning and critical thinking 
  • How to share your thinking in discussion and learn from others 

Credits: 10

Weeks: 10 (every Tuesday)

Delivery: Online (live)

Start date/time: 4th of April 2023-19.00-21.00

Class code: 12175

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Psychology and Counselling Skills

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Cognitive psychology: an introduction

How do we form memories, learn language and make decisions? How do psychologists study human cognition? This course addresses such key questions while introducing students to the most significant concepts and findings of Cognitive Psychology, the study of our internal mental processes.  

Students will also have the opportunity to develop their understanding of experimental research in this area through hands-on experience.  

Credits: 10

Weeks: 10 (Every Tuesday)

Delivery: Online live

Start date/time: 4th of April 2023- 19.00-21.00

Code: 25187

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Health Psychology 

The subfield of Health Psychology is concerned with understanding how people make health related decisions, and react, cope with and recover from illness.  

In this introductory course, you’ll study the range of factors influencing health, illness and wellbeing whilst exploring questions such as:  

  • What is health? 
  • Why do health inequalities exist despite free access to the NHS? 
  • Why do people put their health and wellbeing at risk?  
  • What is the relationship between stress and illness?   
  • How can patient-practitioner communication be improved? 

Choose this course if you want to learn about: 

  • Psychological models explaining factors underlying health behaviours 
  • The effects of individual differences and group influences on health 
  • The factors influencing responses to illness and subsequent coping style  
  • Psychological methods used to facilitate behaviour change

Credits: 10

Weeks: 10 (Every Thursday)

Delivery: Online live

Start date/time: 6th of April 2023- 19.00-21.00

Code: 25133

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What can psychology tell us about disability? 

Developmental disabilities refer to a group of conditions, affecting an individual’s physical, learning, language or behaviour development.  

In this introductory course, you’ll explore developmental disabilities through the lens of Psychology, covering issues such as: 

  • Sleep 
  • Emotion 
  • Communication 
  • Intelligence  
  • Memory  

Choose this course if you want to learn about: 

  • Key characteristics of a range of developmental disabilities 
  • The impact of a range of developmental disabilities on Sleep, Emotion, Communication, Intelligence and Memory

Credits: 10

Delivery: Online anytime

Start date/time: 4th of April 2023

Code: 25112

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Science

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Data Science: Introduction to R

Data is everywhere, and being able to understand and interpret it is of increasing importance in our modern world. 

This course will introduce you to R: an open-source, flexible and powerful statistical software used to manipulate, analyse and visualise data. R is used extensively in both academia (e.g. in Statistics and Psychology) and in industry. R is heavily used in genetics, epidemiology, manufacturing and finance, as well as by data analysts and research programmers. 

Using the RStudio interface, you will learn how to:  

  • wrangle data: to combine and extract information of interest, and to clean up data into the format required for further analysis 
  • perform descriptive analyses to extract summary information and to visualise data in academic-standard plots 
  • interpret common error messages and use in-built facilities to debug your code  

The course aims to provide you with the starter skills and confidence to continue developing your R skills independently after the conclusion of the course. 

Credits: 10

Weeks: 10 (every Thursday)

Delivery: Online (live)

Start date/time: 6th of April 2023-19.00-21.00

Class code: 25122

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Register